About the writer

Writer, blogger, photographer, breast cancer survivor. I write about whatever strikes my fancy as I meander through life.

krapf school bus issues

 Meet school bus number 94 from the Krapf Bus Company. I was about a car length and a half behind this bus coming up to the stop sign of Collegeview and Morstein. Good thing I’m not a distracted driver, because this bus driver without warning and without really looking behind them threw it into reverse off Morstein to turn around and head in the opposite direction. Seriously, the bus was hauled around like it was a little sports car.

It must be a full moon for school buses from this company because when I was coming down Hershey’s Mill Road five minutes prior to this I was tailgated the entire way by bus 122 from the same company. 

Hershey’s Mill Road  is narrow and quite windy. I was going the speed limit. I am guessing that the bus was in a hurry to get to Villa Maria or something. But it doesn’t really matter, it’s kind of disconcerting to have a giant yellow school bus riding on your tail.

Fortunately I got to turn off so hurry hurry bus driver could be on their merry way. But to run into another Krapf’s driver with issues at Collegeview and Morstein was sort of like a full moon experience.

These bus drivers have a schedule to keep, I get that. But they  carrying precious cargo, so in addition to not hitting people on the road in their vehicles or coming close to doing that, they should have a care for the people’s children they are carrying.

Oh, and I’ve been noticing another bus related phenomenon  on King Road lately. People in an all fired hurry who seem to feel the need to pass the Septa buses when they stop around Immaculata and the William Henry apartments at high rates of speed. These people don’t even look to see where the people getting on and off the bus are crossing. And not even the enormous axle eating potholes on King Road seem to slow them down.

Thanks for stopping by.

fiesta!!

 

I have always liked vintage Fiestaware. And over the weekend I scored some for myself and it’s from the 1950s and it’s really cool. And it was a bargain. Fiestaware can get quite pricey.

Something about it that just makes you smile – I think it’s because the colors are so happy. But I only like the vintage, the modern styles and colors do nothing for me.  

Years ago when my cousin Suzy was still alive I remember doing antique trips with her and there were a couple places in and around New Hope/Flemington/Lambertville that sold a lot of true vintage Fiestaware. One of the stores in New Jersey in particular still stands out in my mind’s eye. They had tons of Fiestaware and a lot of Russian nesting dolls. I wish I could remember the names of the stores but I can’t.

Anyway I just thought I would share this vintage score. And yes I am using it as every day china. That’s what it was designed for.

when non-profits become bad neighbors

  

Your eyes do not deceive you. This is  indeed a photo taken Monday of a parking lot resembling an obstacle course. This parking lot is not in Chester County thank goodness, the  location is Ardmore, Pennsylvania. In Lower Merion Township where West Chester’s former borough manager Ernie McNeely is now the Township Manager. 

The Junior League of Philadelphia is doing a huge renovation project at the thrift shop and headquarters in Ardmore. I applaud them for all the good works they have done for decades, but they are being astoundingly dad neighbors now.

Ardmore is a town that suffers from parking issues chronically. So if you add a construction project where construction vehicles park every which way and dumpsters get put and left in thru lanes for very tight parking lots,  it creates a driving hazard and an impediment to small businesses.  Believe it or not, close to that dumpster out of the sight line of the photo is an outdoor dining space for a small café. I can’t imagine they have much business with a giant dumpster RIGHT there.

One of my closest friends owns a store that you literally cannot get to through this parking lot a lot of the time right now because of these construction vehicles. So if customers and suppliers can’t reach the stores and store owners and employees are having a hard time, how are small businesses coping? The answer is not really well and it’s just not fair.  (I also have to note that many of these buildings have apartments and office suites above them and all of those people are having a hard time too)

Why can’t the Junior League find other parking close by for the construction vehicles?  Why does it seem like they are getting preferential treatment and everyone is letting them get away with murder in the parking lot? Other businesses can’t stop being in business because the Junior League is renovating their building.  

Don’t misunderstand me, the building they (The Junior League) are in has been long in need of renovation, it’s kind of a pit, but they should be more considerate of their neighbors and they aren’t. If there are projects which have to block portions of the parking lot at times during this project (which keeps occurring), why not start it a little earlier in the morning before businesses open or why not provide neighboring businesses advance notice that the parking lot will be blocked on certain dates for certain amounts of time?

I used to be a big fan of the Junior League of Philadelphia, and hopefully someday I will be able to be once again. But right now they are simply a nonprofit behaving badly. Think of this post as #dogshaming of a charitable organization. Somehow I don’t think when Mary Harriman founded the Junior League in 1901 being a bad neighbor was part of her plan.

This is yet another reason why I am glad I no longer live on the Main Line. I would however love to be able to navigate this parking lot safely so I can patronize my friend’s business. I  used to donate to the Junior League for their shop once in a while and I never will again after this. 

  

spring on the windowsill

A couple things here and there are popping up in the garden, so I had to bring a little bit inside on a grey and rainy spring day. The Rosenberger’s dairy bottle was a find in Lancaster County a couple weeks ago. For five dollars it makes the perfect size vase for my kitchen windowsill!