calling all preservationists and angels: historic st. peter’s church needs you!

It is a horrible economic time to have a crisis with a historic structure, let alone one of the most favorite and beloved in the Philadelphia region.  It is because of that this blog is making a little side trip to the Society Hill section of Philadelphia where I was born.

St. Peter’s, is an 18th century, American Revolution relevent Episcopalian Church in Society Hill and 4th and Pine streets.  I went to grade school at St. Peter’s School, so I have many happy memories of this church (and others like getting a book autographed every year at the St. Peter’s book fair by Marguerite D’Angeli who was a friend of the headmistress.)

St. Peter’s was one of the Society Hill landmarks that was my playground as a child.  It is also one of the most beautiful and serene places in Philadelphia.

I attended Easter Services at St. Peter’s and it was like instantly going back in time to when I was a little girl.  St. Peter’s is one of those places that makes you realize you can go home again.  From her beautiful windows to the high boxes inside the church, to the climb up the stairs for a look out over the church yard, St. Peter’s is just a very cool place.

I learned on the news today that St. Peter’s needs the help of anyone who can spare a dollar or two.  The church is being forced to close due to instability in the roof of the historic structure.  St. Peter’s Church was designed by Robert Smith and opened in 1761 as an offshoot of Christ Church in Old City. The Church’s tower, designed by William Strickland, was added in 1842.

St. Peter’s is a National Historic Landmark.

Saint Peter’s is not just a historic structure, it is a church that does many good things including a food cupboard.  They live their slogan of “Open Hearts. Open Minds”

Can you help save St. Peter’s?  The faster they have angels drop donations on them, the faster they will reopen.

Donations of any amount can be sent as follows:

Saint Peter’s Church, ATTENTION: HISPIC,313 Pine Street Philadelphia, PA  19106

 Media on the topic:

Plan Philly: St. Peter’s Church roof at risk of collapse

St. Peter’s Church at 3rd and Pine streets has been in continuous use since the 1760s, but parishioners will not be able to worship in the sanctuary this Sunday.

The Inquirer reports that St. Peter’s sanctuary roof is at risk of collapse. An engineering firm reportedly inspected the sanctuary’s roof trusses and found their condition dangerous enough to order the building closed until stabilization measures can be completed.

WHYY Newsworks: With roof in danger of failing, historic Philly church takes sabbatical  May 17, 2012  By Kevin McCorry

When George Washington was in Philadelphia for the Continental Congress, he attended services at a relatively new Episcopal church called St. Peter’s in what’s now known as Society Hill.

Now, more than 250 years after it was built, the same church still stands at Third and Pine streets.  It serves more than 400 families and educates children at its elementary school across the street.

The stalwart church, however, is in danger after so many years…..Even after the building is reopened, Laughlin said the congregation will need to raise $1 million to completely update the church’s structure, a prospect which could take up to three years.

Philadelphia Inquirer: Sanctuary of St. Peter’s Church closes amid fears of collapse

May 16, 2012|Bob Moran

The sanctuary of the historic St. Peter’s Church in Society Hill has been closed after several roof trusses were deemed at risk of collapse, the Rev. Ledlie Laughlin told congregants in an e-mail Wednesday.

An architectural engineering firm concluded that the trusses “are sufficiently at risk of collapse that the sanctuary must be closed at once,” Laughlin wrote. The firm said the sanctuary could be reopened in several months if the roof is stabilized. Replacing the roof could take two or three years.

5 thoughts on “calling all preservationists and angels: historic st. peter’s church needs you!

  1. This is very sad to me. Strickland’s teacher was Benjamin Latrobe who designed one of my favorite buildings, The Basilica of the Assumption in Baltimore. I enjoy being able to go into the buildings and see how everything was put together.

  2. Pingback: chestercountyramblings featured in a post on “preservation nation”! | chestercountyramblings

  3. thx great piece, re-posted to Facebook. It’s due to support like yours that we’re $1.1 down, $700,000 to go!. thx You are great & we are grateful.

  4. Pingback: positive influences | chestercountyramblings

Comments are closed.