saving seeds

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September is here and it makes me think about starting garden planning for next year. I will do one or two more rounds of planting, including bulbs, but now is when I start to think about garden seasons yet to come.

I am not much of a seed saver for being a rabid gardener. Mostly because in years past I have forgotten I saved seeds and discovered them years later when they were no longer viable.

I am told saving seeds is not rocket science, it’s all about clipping the seed pods and flower heads when they are dried on the plant. In my photo you will see some flower heads that while spent aren’t really dried enough. That is mostly artistic license because I was staging my photo to show what I was snipping.

I decided that now that I am into my new garden a couple of years that although I did not really have much as far as clumps of perennials to split yet, I did have enough to let some plants start to go to seed.

I should probably be more studious in my approach and separate all of my seeds, but I have decided to create my own seed mix. I like what I have in my flower beds and want to replicate the plant combinations. To further outrage the seed cataloguers out there and the meticulous seed gatherers I have thrown caution to the wind and have mixed annuals and perennials.

Better Homes and Gardens says:

Seed saving has long been the primary way to pass plants down from generation to generation. Continue the tradition of sharing the best of nature’s gifts by saving seeds in your garden.

The best plants for seed saving are heirlooms, old-fashioned varieties, and open-pollinated plants. This is because the seeds usually grow into plants that look like their parents. Seeds saved from hybrids will not usually grow into the same plants as their parents.

I have grown a lot of old fashioned favorites in this garden. I have also planted new cultivars of old fashioned favorites. Zinnias, buddleia, rudbeckia, echinacea, false blue indigo, lisianthus, daisies, and sunflowers. I like the jumble of them in my beds. I plant them with various other plants, herbs, and shrubs. I am cultivating a cottage garden look.

I know that with some of the seeds I have collected, I might end up with a plant different than the “parent”. But that might be fun! I am a direct sow person when it comes to seeds for the most part. Depending on how I feel later this winter I might attempt starting seeds indoors. I will collect some seeds and leave the balance of plant blooms to dry and self seed in the garden.

Here is what Fine Gardening has to say about saving seeds:

When I was new to ­gardening, I depended upon the kindness of friends and strangers to help fill my beds. Unfortunately, I was too green to realize what treasures I had in hand until I’d wasted them…..Collecting seeds is one of those activities that makes me feel like a wealthy woman. As the seed supply spills out of the first, small envelopes into manila 8210s and Mason jars, I take as much pleasure as Midas in counting my riches….. By the time I’m finished in fall, I will have shelves stuffed with the makings of next year’s garden.

….A few minutes of shaking ripe seed into an envelope in the early fall can produce a summer garden next year that is filled with mallows, petunias, marigolds, and other favor­ites—all grown for free. ­Saving your own seeds ­enables you to use your garden budget for major nonplant investments, like that teakwood table and chairs you’ve been lusting after.

You can save seeds from all kinds of plants. Annuals are the easiest because they’re the most prolific at producing seeds, but perennials and biennials are entirely possible.

For more on seeds and starting them, visit Fine Gardening HERE.

And for those of you on Facebook, I have started a Chester County Ramblings Gardening Group. I had noticed that while there were many yard sale, garage sale, and related household items groups, there wasn’t a place for Chester County Gardeners and other local gardeners. I am pleased to report that less than 24 hours since creation, gardening enthusiasts are lining up!

The Chester County Ramblings Gardening Group is a closed group, so you will need to request to join or ask a friend already in the group to add you pending admin approval.

I love to garden and many of you do as well. I thought it would be fun to have a group devoted to gardening. A place for folks to swap seeds, look for plants, re-home perennials and other garden plants, share advice and tips, share garden photos.

This will be a closed group and we will be pleasant. I reserve the right to remove anyone who cannot garden well with others.

People may also post to sell garden furniture, tools, plants, statuary, you name it….as long as it is garden or plant related.

People may post what they are in search of acquiring for their gardens, from plants to patio furniture.

Chester County residents are preferred, but no true gardener refused.

Chester County nurseries and plant growers are welcome to post sales and promotions.

Chester County businesses who deal in gardening supplies, vintage garden accents, bird houses, bird baths, hardscaping, landscaping,garden furniture,statuary and so on also welcome.

Thanks for stopping by!