anna maciejewska is still missing

I was asked by a friend who lives in Charlestown to post about Anna Maciejewska , who is still missing.  

According  to media and local reports she has not been seen since like April 2nd or April 10th (I have seen both dates in media reports and on social media, so I don’t know which one is correct. All I know is she has been missing for weeks at this point.)

I am guessing last person who saw her is her husband because well she is married and has a little boy named Andrew (do I have his name right?) who I think is like 4 or 5.  He must miss his mommy something fierce, so I figured I would put a post up in the hopes like all the media reports that someone somewhere has seen something.

Has anyone seen Anna Bronislawa Maciejewska?  The PA State Police want to hear from anyone who may have seen her. Call 911 or Embreeville barracks at 610-486-6280


Media reports continue to go out and the AP has picked up the story. 

It would be great if a national law and justice show like Nancy Grace could tell her story so please, if you are in the media or know media, pay it forward so Anna’s son  Andrew (?) doesn’t lose his mom.  Anna is Polish and I am also told that family in Poland is frantic.

Anna Maciejewska went missing from the Charlestown section of Malvern.  She was driving a blue Audi A4 she is 43 years old and 5′ 4″ and 150 pounds 
There is a Facebook page up for FINDING Anna Maciejewska.

She’s a mom. She’s not going to leave a little child like that. Please, if you have seen Anna Maciejewska, call the police.

happy may day!

Photo from St. Peter’s May Day celebration early 1970s.

When I was a little girl I went to St.Peter’s School at 4th and Pine in the Society Hill section of Philadelphia.  We celebrated May Day as a school.

May Day was something all of the kids looked forward to.  Somewhere I have photos my mother took, but the first photo you see in this post and the last were given to me a few years ago by my childhood and adult friend Anthony. What you see in the photo was some of the dancing we did along with the dancing around the Maypole which weaved beautiful and bright ribbons into a lovely pattern as we went round and round.

May Day was such fun! There was the dancing around the Maypole and the other dancing which included dancing over clay pipes – a very Celtic/Gaelic dance.  

I was never coordinated enough to do any of the fancy or specialized dancing but I loved the magic of the Maypole and all of May Day.  In my minds eye I still have a little flickers of memory of these May Day events. I swear today I can hear echoes of the music and clapping!  I remember as a little girl it was the one time I wanted to have the right dress for May Day celebrations. 

Two photos are from when I went to St. Peter’s but the  other photos are old photos I have found on the Internet so people can see what the celebrations were like.

Caroline Seamans, the Headmistress of St. Peter’s when I was a girl instilled some wonderful traditions. It was a great place to be a child.  It wasn’t perfect, and like any school had issues, but was a pretty cool place.

May Day is known also as International Workers Day and today the news in our area is showing demonstrations of public school teachers in front of City Hall in Philadelphia. But that’s not the history of May Day I remember as a child.

May Day is a traditional spring holiday in many cultures, to this very day. Early May Day celebrations started with ancient Romans who celebrated the Festival of the Roman Goddess of flowers, Flora. Ancient Romans held on April 27. Germanic countires celebrated Walpurgis Night celebrations of the Germanic countries and in the British Ilses was the Pagan holoday of Beltane, held around on April 30.

As time marched forward, all of these celebrations got folded into May Day celebrations. These May Day celebrations which have had increasingly waning popularity which I find so truly sad given the innocence and beauty wnd fun of May Day used to mean these May dances and Maypole.

There was also once upon a time a lovely tradition of May baskets – little baskets of spring flowers and treats left anonymously with a glad heart for neighbors. England and Ireland still maintains a lot of the May Day traditions from what my research has indicated, and there they crown May Queens as well. In Finland they keep the tradition of Vappu, their May Day street festival and carnivals.

May Day was lovely as a child. We felt so grown up and special dancing around the Maypoles. I am so glad I have those memories.

Here is a link to a video of a celebration in a village in Cornwall – CLICK HERE. And Bryn Mawr College has a big May Day celebration as part of it’s traditions – CLICK HERE. At Bryn Mawr College they also have Morris Men who dance.

Anyway, happy May Day and rabbit rabbit.

Maypole St. Peter’s School Philadelphia – early 1970s

cheer on face of america cyclists on their stop at east whiteland fire company saturday, april 29 at 7:45 a.m.

When it comes to our first responders and our military, we can put our political differences aside in this country and simply be patriots one and all.  On Saturday, April 29th, 2017 there is that opportunity at East Whiteland Fire Company (205 Conestoga Rd, Malvern, PA 19355)

I am asking you if you have the time to kindly turn out to cheer on the cyclists who are part of the Face of America Ride which has two different branches that meet at historic Gettysburg PA.

Since 1987, this Holbrook, New York-based non-profit  World Team Sports has created and directed dozens of inclusive outdoor sporting events for adaptive and able-bodied athletes. From coast to coast and around the world, our organization’s cross-country bicycle rides, challenging team competitions, high mountain climbs, water sports challenges and events for athletes of all ages have changed lives through sports.

Face of America 2017 Logo

Our Face of America bicycle and hand cycle ride is their most popular event, with hundreds of riders annually. Since 2010, it has been one of the largest non-competitive charitable rides in the mid-Atlantic region.

Adaptive military veterans, along with currently active military and retired military from all service branches, will join first responders and civilian athletes for Face of America. Participating athletes can select between two distinctive routes ending in Gettysburg. This year for the very first time, here in Chester County, East Whiteland Fire Company is a pit stop for these wonderful men and women.

Yes, it’s true, East Whiteland Fire Company is for the first time a comfort station host for this national non-profit World T.E.A.M. Sports‘ two-day Face of America bicycle and hand cycle ride to historic Gettysburg . Not only is it cool that they are participating in this way,  it’s a real honor!

Please come out to this very special event and show your support for the riders by waving American flags (provided) as they come off the trail and ride into the East Whiteland Fire company!

This may be one of the most inspiring sporting events you’ll ever experience. The route, which culminates in historic Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, was developed to remember the exceptional sacrifices that First Respondors and Veterens and have made throughout our history in protecting our communities and our nation.

For more information please email  Ms. Debbie Abel at abeldeb88@gmail.com or click on
http://worldteamsports.org/face-of-america-gettysburg-2017-1/ .

It is also important to note that I was told East Whiteland Fire Company’s own Mike Matkovic has been a part of this race.

Look, these men and women are the living embodiment of service above self, so as a way to say “thank you for your service”  please turn out on Saturday, April 29th from 7:45 AM to 9 AM  and cheer on these riders and show your support for them and the fire company as they come off the trail and ride into the East Whiteland Fire company!

I had never heard of this organization until Debbie Abel sent me the website link.  I went to the web page and I watched this short little YouTube video:

I had tears running down my face within moments. These folks, our military and first responders are the real deal. These are our American Heroes.

Come cheer them on!

Face of America Ride 2017

Saturday, April 29th 7:45 AM – 9 AM (please arrive at 7:45 as per event page)

East Whiteland Fire Company 205 Conestoga Rd, Malvern, PA 19355

 

vintage gardening books

Like the late Suzy Bales, another garden writer Chester County native garden writer David Culp inspires. 

Suzy Bales inspired me to truly make my current garden one of four seasons and to plant gardens around our home on all four sides. (I still consider it a work in progress, but it’s getting there.) The books she wrote titled Down to Earth Gardener and The Garden in Winter have truly guided me in my current garden to that end.  They are lovely books that you can find quite reasonably priced new and used on Amazon.com.  Mrs. Bales sadly passed away a year ago this time, but you can still benefit from her knowledge through her books.

David Culp is the author of The Layered Garden: Design Lessons for Year-Round Beauty from Brandywine Cottage.  You can also find his book easily on Amazon.com. He is the one that made me see the beauty of layering your garden.  It is something that I have always sort of fidfled with, but his book took it to a whole new level.  

I love my gardening books as much as my cookbooks.

I have been collecting vintage gardening books since I was about 19. They are well loved and well used and much like my cookbooks, I do not lend them out. I totally encourage people to look for vintage gardening books, much like vintage cookbooks they often contain basic, time honored traditions that can get lost in translation in the Internet age.

Long before there was the Internet, Facebook, or Pinterest you relied on your own research. You poured through gardening books, you went on garden tours, you belonged to a local gardening club.

I have always been a rabid gardener, and I love to learn about gardens.  I discovered years ago quite by accident but every time you went to a garage sale or a rummage sale or thrift shop a lot of the books that people got rid of were gardening books and cookbooks.  And many of both kinds of books were as pretty to look at as they were practical for the information contained within them.

To an extent while I am a modern woman I am also an old fashioned woman. I love what people used to call the “home arts” – or making your house a home , creating your garden, decorating your home yourself, and cooking.

Some of the gardening books I have are quite old. And a lot of the ones I have are books of actual gardens, a lot of which no longer exist due to development and progress. Families die off, properties are sold.  It is a sad fact of life. Not every person moving into a house wants to garden. And sometimes depending on where something is located, the property and the gardens don’t survive. Often whomever acquires the property will give people permission to take plants, or buy them from them.

That’s how I ended up with really old hellebores years ago.  

There were a pair of old Victorian houses near the Rosemont, PA train station which had been run down apartments for years and years and finally when they were totally decrepit they were sold to a developer. I contacted the developer before they razed the houses for their condominium project.  For years in spite of watching these two once very cool Victorians deteriorate, I was fascinated by these lovely hellebores that I have never seen anyplace else to this day.  The developer let me take a bucketful of the hellebores. And although the gardens were quite overgrown by this point there were still some remnants of the design left and that was also valuable to check out and commit to my memory for future gardens.

I still look at the photos of these gardens in my books, captured and frozen in time, and the majority of the photos are black and white. They also inspire me.  The gardens of yesterday that only live in photos inside an old book.

These gardens that live only in photos of old books can so spark the imagination if you let them. They are to me as valuable as some people find the photos of gardens on Pinterest today.

Gardening is truly an art form. And how your garden looks is entirely personal. You literally get out of your garden what you put into it and as long as your garden make you happy that is what is important.

Look for garden books you like new and old and let them inspire you in your garden.  Good sources for gardening books, and even cookbooks are (again) locally at a garage or rummage sale, at a resale shop or used bookstore. If you want to go online, check out both Amazon and eBay.  Locally, I have also found many fabulous gardening books at Jenkins Arboretum.

I also love book swaps – if you are finished with the book swap it to a friend for another book.  A gardening book swap is also a great excuse for gardeners to get together!

Happy gardening!