third time is the charm with a spot for a lamp

I have this table in the family room that I have been trying to find a lamp that was just right for it for a few years.

Above is lamp number three. And the third time is the charm!

I went out to the Smithfield Barn today. My friend Kristin had just acquired this newly rewired converted antique oil lamp. It’s green glass.

I love colored glass.

The lamp had a chimney and a plain white shade. I won’t tell you exactly what I paid because I bundled, but trust me it was next to nothing.

But when I came home I realized the pierced and hand cut and colored vintage lampshade I had been resisting getting rid of was the perfect shade for this lamp!

I am very psyched that I now finally have found the lamp that works best!

a box full of buttons

2015/01/img_0360.jpg

I bought a box full of buttons today. Actually it was a crusty old tin of buttons.

Anyway amongst the little mother of pearl and other kinds of buttons and beads I found cool stuff: A little cameo and some kind of uniform tack from an old Pennsylvania Railroad uniform. You don’t realize what a big employer the Pennsylvania Railroad was until you start seeing things in Chester County, which is loaded with railroad memorabilia.

Also in this pile of buttons were a bunch of men’s black and white tie old evening studs. Some of the studs are mother of pearl and are are very Downton Abbey evening wear!

It is so fun pouring through the buttons and wondering what they came off of.

Thanks for stopping by!
2015/01/img_0362.jpg

farmhouse chic

20140222-120947.jpg

My near and dear ones like to tease me about my affinity for farm animals (cows, goats, and chickens in particular). I am told I will always be too much of a city girl to make a good farm girl (apparently I need to tolerate long power outages better), but a girl is allowed to dream, right?

So does that make me perhaps just an accidental country girl in the making?

Mind you, the teasing is in good fun, so I really don’t mind. What I do know is I love living in Chester County and especially like the rural aspects and the open spaces. I also love the fun of the hunt for cool pieces to decorate with, and Chester County is loaded with places and even warm weather flea markets. Jake’s Flea Market in Barto comes to mind. Except Barto is actually Berks County, but that is worth the drive I am told. I have not been yet.

Will I ever love long term power outages and trees pounding the house in storms? Probably not, but surviving this winter means I am hopefully better prepared next time and hopefully we won’t experience a next time like this winter for quite a while.

As many know I have developed an affinity for certain kinds of things that would be classified as either primitive or farmhouse chic. Vintage patchwork quilts, oil lamps, rustic candlesticks, and things like milking stools would fall into that category.

Milking stools, you ask?

Yes. They are fun and add whimsy to a room. I like old wooden footstools too. You can find them all over, and the price points should always be reasonable because they are so readily available.

A reasonable price point in my opinion maxes out at around $25. I see plain wood foot and milking stools at all sorts of price points, but if the cost goes over $25 , unless they are some truly amazing bit of woodworking I loose interest. I am a picker and bargain hunter at heart, sorry.

There is a big difference in my mind between a fine country antique and an item that has a utilitarian and real purpose that also can have a second life as a fun accent in your home.

I have two. One I found languishing under a table at Reseller’s Consignment in Frazer and one came from the Smithfield Barn in Downingtown. They both came in under $25 each. They are handmade and of solid hardwood and have three leg. Milking stools have three and four legs. I have been told by actual dairy farmers that the three legged stools balance the best on uneven surfaces.

One of my stools has three legs and the other four. I love the patina of the natural wood and oil them occasionally. I am not a fan of candy coating beautiful wood in milk paint. That is the taste of a lot of people and a good way to renew beat up wood pieces, but generally speaking not for my personal taste. I like those accents in the homes of others, it just doesn’t work for us in our home .

Anyway, they will never be a priceless heirloom, but I love them. People will actually sit on them and they make an amusing conversation piece. And some milking stools are simply beautiful examples of handmade craftsmanship.

20140222-120703.jpg