corn bread….with fresh corn ūüĆĹ

Corn Bread made with fresh corn.

Yum.

It’s an easy solution to not wasting corn on the cob that you may have cooked but not buttered and eaten. It also makes your cornbread not as dry as normal cornbread can be and adds a layer of flavor/texture.

It could not be simpler to make:

1 cup of white all purpose flour

1 cup cornmeal (Mine came from Anselma Mill)

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 tablespoon baking powder

Dash of powdered ginger or cinnamon (but not together)

1 cup whole milk

2 eggs, beaten

1/4 cup melted butter with 2 tablespoons bacon grease

1/2 cup sugar

1 cup fresh sweet corn cooked and drained

** The wildcard if you want to spice it up is to mince one fresh jalape√Īo pepper and add it to the batter

Preheat oven to 400¬į F and really grease a 9″ x 9″ baking pan (I use butter.)

If your fresh cooked corn is still on the cob use a knife and take it off the cob. Let it sit in a strainer over a bowl so any additional liquid drains out.

Mix together all dry ingredients.

Stir in all wet ingredients.

Stir in fresh corn, and if you are using the wildcard minced jalape√Īo this is where you add that as well.

Do not over mix or your corn bread batter will be tough.

Before you add your batter to your pan put the greased pan in the oven for 2 or 3 minutes.

Pour batter into the pan, and bake at 400¬į F for 25 to 28 minutes.

It might be baked sooner — so you might want to check it with a toothpick or a skewer and see if it comes out clean from the center of the pan. I have gotten pretty good at eyeballing it over the years, so if the edge of the cornbread has kind of separated from the pan and it’s a nice goldeny color— it’s done.

Cool enough to serve warm, or eat at room temperature. Make sure you wrap leftovers tightly or it will dry out.

Enjoy!

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savoring summer

Summer always means fresh pesto sauce. And fresh pesto is totally easy to make.

All it is is olive oil, huge bunches of fresh basil, salt to taste, fresh garlic cloves, a pinch of thyme, a sweet onion, a dash or two of balsamic vinegar,and a red bell pepper if you have one laying around.

Today I probably used about a cup and a half of olive oil. I easily used four cups of fresh basil because my plants need it to be pruned.

You blend it all together in a food processor or blender and you let it sit in the refrigerator to chill so the flavors meld. When you go to heat it up with pasta you can add pine nuts and grated fresh Parmesan cheese. I also like to sauté chicken tenders and add that to a pesto and pasta dish.

People also use pesto sauce in vegetable soups like tomato in particular. Some people also like to add anchovies and sun-dried tomatoes, but I don't really care for that taste combination with pesto sauces .

Often homemade pesto will not be as thick and gummy as store-bought pesto sauces but those sauces have thickeners and / or preservatives in them. I love homemade pesto sauce, store-bought not so much.

I will also note that I saw the "West Chester Food Co-Op" is advertising a Gazpacho Adaluz (I put them in air quotes because they aren't a real bricks and mortar store they are just a booth I don't understand at the West Chester Growers Market. ) So I thought I would remind my dear readers that I shared such a recipe with you five years ago. It is called Kendall's Gazpacho as it is named after my late mother in law who bought the recipe back from Spain many decades ago.

Click here for the recipe to Kendall's Gazpacho. and the photo you see below is a batch of the gazpacho I made recently. The color of the soup is determined by the color of your vegetables. So when I use green bell pepper it stays green. When I use an orange or red bell pepper, the soup takes a red or orange hue. This is different from other gazpachos and doesn't actually have as many tomatoes as you would put in one of those.

Anyway I hope you make yourselves a batch of pesto and/or gazpacho before the end of the summer. The flavors of fresh vegetables this time of year can't be beat!

Thanks for stopping by my kitchen.

summer recipe back to basics: purple coleslaw


I have been remiss. I haven’t blogged any recipes lately. This evening for dinner we were grilling marinated chicken thighs and my neighbor had given me a beautiful head of purple cabbage so I decided to make coleslaw.

Here is the recipe:

Purple Cabbage Coleslaw

Ingredients

4 cups grated purple cabbage 

1 cup grated carrots

1/2 grated large vidalia onion 

6 heaping tablespoons mayonnaise

2 tablespoon prepared Dijon mustard

5 tablespoons organic cane sugar (Turbinado)

1/3 cup apple cider vinegar 

2 tablespoons fresh minced dill

Freshly ground salt pepper, to taste

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 

1/2 teaspoon ground cumin

Directions

I read somewhere once that purple cabbage is really good for you. A super food full of antibiotics, vitamins, fiber, and other good stuff. I think it also makes a tastier coleslaw. I also add vidalia onion to my coleslaw and fresh dill to the dressing, which I think keeps it fresh and different.

First finely grate cabbage, carrots, and onion. My “Pro Tip” here is I put these vegetables into a fine mesh strainer after grating and set them over a bowl and press gently for some of the extra liquid to drain out.

Mix the cider vinegar, sugar, cumin together. Unless you want a grainy dressing, make sure the sugar is fully dissolved before proceeding and adding the mayonnaise, dijon mustard, olive oil, and fresh dill. Whisk the dressing together briskly and refrigerate for a few minutes.

Next put your veggies in a clean bowl and pour the dressing on top of it. Mix well and then use a little spoon to taste and adjust for salt and pepper as needed. I like fresh ground pepper in coleslaw.

Refrigerate at least an hour before serving.

Enjoy!

why does west chester borough hate the west chester growers market? why are they trying to hurt the market again? 

West Chester Growers Market 2016 season- my photo.

APRIL 2 UPDATE: The Borough of West Chester has posted something I am assuming because I posted the letter people kept sending to me yesterday.

I am posting the borough response  in an effort to be fair. Which is not saying I believe them, is it?

Pursuant to that effort to be fair would it also be fair to say that the Borough of West Chester is casting aspersions upon my character because I dared state the opinion that every year it seems to be something else that is an impediment to one of the most popular and beloved  markets? Why is it West Chester Borough can never seem to just renew the lease prior to opening day of the market? Is that small business friendly? Is that farmer friendly? Family friendly?

Also the Borough of West Chester letter was sent to me by PATRONS of the market some of whom are RESIDENTS of the Borough of West Chester. And last time I checked I can connect the dots and express my opinion unless we are all Pravda on this bus?? Do we still not have a First Amendment or is that also subjective to the capricious whims of small-town politics?

Here is their say and to them I say, if nothing nefarious is afoot the lease should have just been renewed without incident and the market should have merely been treated as the valuable community asset it is , correct? 

But hey it’s ok if I think the Borough doth protesteth too much right? Keep those calls and emails up people, apparently they are feeling the heat? And pack that meeting because at the end of the day those borough council folks work for YOU right?  Maybe next election cycle instead of recycling the political status quo residents should consider other options?


FROM YESTERDAY
Can someone kindly explain to me WHY West Chester Borough seems hell bent on destroying the West Chester Growers’ Market? They seem enamored of the politically connected yet essentially not really anything other than an occasional pop-up food “co-op” (I touched on that in this post months ago) and why is the “co-op” the favored child? 

Today is opening day of the market, and it is supposed to be a happy day. But once again something happy and festive feeling is once again marred, yes marred by the shenanigans of West Chester Borough. See this:


I was sent the above by a friend shopping at the market today. And others texted me. This is spreading like wildfire. 

Once again, West Chester Borough is trying to rid West Chester of one of the area’s longest standing markets, doesn’t it?

Every year there is some sort of B.S. about the parking lot lease, isn’t there?

Every year this market is punished for being a successful market run by nice people, isn’t it?

Please turn out your support from far and wide for this market.   Contact every member of West Chester Borough Council. Contact the media.  Please help the market!

This is the meeting that the above letter says will discuss the fate of our favorite market:


It’s too bad West Chester Borough can’t hold a meeting to discuss the real reasons why they are such jerks to the market, right?

Sign me disgusted.

save thornbury farm!

Photo courtesy of Thornbury Farm

Today I learned I was the darling new topic of conversation of a talk radio host, and I thought well if they are going to talk about this blog, maybe they can talk about this blog wanting folks to help our farmers at Thornbury Farm, right? Maybe they can ask their listeners in Chester County and elsewhere to help Thornbury Farm or one can only hope, right? The media could really help these folks right now by talking this up, right?

Thornbury Farm¬†is located on Route¬†926 and S. New Street on Thornbury Rd in West Chester. (you know a stone’s throw from where Toll Brothers wants to destroy Crebilly Farm?)

After the recent snow/ice/wind event, Thornbury Farm experienced some awful damage from the weather.  Their greenhouse/hoophouse collapsed because of the snow.  I have friends who own a very large nursery concern in Massachusetts and I am familiar with what they have to do during the winter to keep snow from collapsing their greenhouses.  Sometimes the timing is off and you do not get to things in time.  The result is the photo you see above and this is really expensive to rectify.

Friends of Thornbury Farm and the Spackman family have put up a GoFundMe page to help our neighbor farmers at Thornbury defray the costs, the seriously steep costs of correcting what Mother Nature has done here.

Please, they are an over 300 year old still working farm.  They are super nice people who do a lot for the community.  The weight of the snow was too much for the poor greenhouse. The snow has caused about $8,000 in damages and they have crops to be planted in the next three weeks, their heirloom tomatoes. This is literally live or die time.

One of the Thornbury chickens ūüôā

Some folks have rolled up on Thornbury Farm’s Facebook Page and been downright mean to these people about the greenhouse. ¬†It¬†is a high tunnel greenhouse made by Farm Tek designed for this area’s snow load. This was an unusually heavy snow load. These are structures actually used in Alaska. It just did not hold. The weight was too great.

So all of you people out there near and far who love organic produce and locally produced produce? Please help these farmers save their farm and get a replacement greenhouse in time to get their crops started at the right time.  They depend on these crops to keep the farm going.

In Chester County our farmers support us every day with their goods and services.  Please help these farmers with a small donation Рevery little bit helps. Please pay it forward.

Save Thornbury Farm https://www.gofundme.com/save-thornbury-farm

If you prefer to call them and/or send a check or money order:

Thornbury Farm
1256 Thornbury Rd
West Chester, PA 19382
(610) 793-2933
Thornbury can be found on the web via their Facebook page and website.

Thornbury Farm was founded in 1709 with a stone house. The “main house” is the first quarried home in Pennsylvania and was built using the property’s own quarry. On this location, there stood a log cabin that was built in the 1600’s. The original owner was a blacksmith who used the abundant limestone to make flux in an old lime kilm.

The house was added to approximately every 80 years. The serpentine adition with its main stair case was used as the first public library in Chester County. In the mid 1800’s, a kitchen was added with a beehive oven. The oven doors still exist and this room eventually became a dining room. Finally, a modern kitchen was added in the 1940’s.

Over the years, other buildings were added including a large stone spring house, a bank barn in 1740 and another farm house in 1812. The 1812 house and the main house were later used as stops on the Underground Railroad.

The Farm is the site of the final troop engagement of the Battle of Brandywine, the largest land battle of the American Revolution. It was during this battle that our flag was displayed and fired upon by the British for the first time. All of the generals were visible to each other and each side suffered heavy losses and casualties.

During the battle, soldiers from the Continental Army had run up the farm’s stream to avoid a crushing pincer movement by the German Hessian soldiers. Instead, the Americans became trapped between the Hessians on South New Street and the English on the other side of the stream. So many Americans were shot and bayonneted, it was said the blood flowed over two miles to the Brandywine.

 

Another one of my Thornbury Farm photos. Love this place !